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2017 Virginia Aviation Hall of Fame

October 28 @ 5:30 pm - 9:00 pm

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 20, 2017

Virginia Aeronautical Historical Society to induct NASA Mathematician Katherine G. Johnson and SR-71 Pilot “Buz” Carpenter into Virginia Aviation Hall of Fame at annual induction dinner October 28 
The Virginia Aeronautical Historical Society announced today that the 2017 class of inductees to the Virginia Aviation Hall of Fame are retired NASA mathematician and space flight computation expert Katherine G. Johnson and retired U.S. Air Force Col. Adelbert “Buz” Carpenter. The annual induction dinner will be held October 28 at the Fredericksburg Expo Center.
Mrs. Johnson, who was the subject of the recent Oscar nominated hit movie and best selling book Hidden Figures, played a crucial role in the development of space travel in the U.S. while blazing trails for African American women. In 2015, she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom and NASA named its new computational research building after her, only the third NASA building to ever be named for an individual.
She was graduated from West Virginia State summa cum laud in 1937 with degrees in Mathematics and French at the age of 18, when her peers were graduating from high school. In 1953, she started her career at the National Committee for Aeronautics which later became the National Air and Space Administration. During her career with NACA/NASA, Mrs. Johnson was one of a few women, much less African American women, who were active in direct support of the American space program. Using her knowledge of analytic geometry, she calculated the launch windows and trajectories for the May 5, 1961 space flight of Alan Shepard, Jr., the first American in space; John Glenn’s first American orbital mission on February 20, 1962; the 1969 Apollo 11 mission (the first moon landing), and helped bring safely back Earth the crew of the 1970 Apollo 13 moon mission, which experienced a massive malfunction that put the astronauts’ lives at risk. Later, she worked on the Space Shuttle program, the Earth Resources Satellite, and on the plans for a mission to Mars, as well as authoring or coauthoring 26 research reports.
Col. Carpenter, an SR-71 pilot and instructor earned, 777 flight hours while executing global reconnaissance missions in the world’s fastest-ever plane. He earned his pilot wings in the Air Force after graduation from the U.S. Air Force Academy, eventually accruing more than 4,400 jet flight hours. He served as a C-141 aircraft commander doing worldwide airlift, an RF- 4 instructor pilot in combat in the Vietnam War, an F-4E squadron commander and as a pilot of the historic U-2 spy plane, piloting it above 70,000 feet. He also served as a Wing Commander in Europe during Desert Storm and as the F “Black World” programmer in the Pentagon, involved in programs such as the F- 117, B-2 Bomber and F-22. At the end of his Air Force career he was Vice Commander of 2nd Air Force, which possessed the Air Force’s intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance mission aircraft. Following his retirement from the Air Force, he became involved with the National Air and Space Museum’s Udvar-Hazy Center in Dulles and has been a key player in the development of its tour information and docent training
The Virginia Aviation Hall of Fame was founded and is maintained by the Virginia Aeronautical Historical Society, which will celebrate its 40th anniversary in 2018. Among the many members of the Hall of Fame are Hampton native and Virginia Tech alumnus Christopher Kraft, who headed NASA’s Manned Space Flight Center from the 1960s-1970s, during which Project Apollo landed Americans on the moon; and Neil November, a famous Richmond philanthropist. The VAHS founded the Virginia Aviation Museum then saved its collection in the face of the VAM’s closing by the Science Museum of Virginia in June 2016.
Tickets for the Hall of Fame dinner are still available and can be purchased by calling 540-642-4417 or e-mailing vahsonline@gmail.com. The Virginia Aviation Hall of Fame is located at the Shannon Air Museum in Fredericksburg.

Join Us As We Celebrate The Induction of Col. Adelbert “Buz” Carpenter and Katherine E. Johnson Into
The
Virginia Aviation Hall of Fame!

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Col. Adelbert “Buz” Carpenter

Retired Air Force Colonel Adelbert “Buz” Carpenter earned his pilot wings in the Air Force after graduation from the US Air Force Academy, eventually accruing over 4,400 jet flight hours.  He served as a C-141 aircraft commander doing worldwide airlift,  an RF-4 instructor pilot in combat in the Vietnam Conflict, an SR-71 instructor pilot earning 777 flight hours while executing global reconnaissance missions, an F-4E squadron commander, and, finally as a pilot of the historic U-2 piloting his aircraft above 70,000 feet. Carpenter served as a Wing Commander in Europe during Desert Storm and as the USAF “Black World” programmer in the Pentagon, involved in programs such as the F-117, B-2 Bomber, and F-22. At the end of his Air Force career he was Vice Commander of 2nd Air Force, which possessed the Air Force’s Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance mission aircraft. Following his retirement from the Air Force, he became involved as a volunteer with the Udvar-Hazy Center and has been a key player in the development of their tour information and docent training.

Katherine E. Johnson

The subject of the recent hit movie, Hidden Figures, Katherine Coleman Goble Johnson played a crucial role in the development of space travel in the U.S. while blazing trails for African American women. Johnson graduated from West Virginia State summa cum laud in 1937 with degrees in Mathematics and French at the age of 18, when her peers were graduating from high school.  In 1953, she started her career at the National Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) which later became the National Air and Space Administration (NASA). During her career with NACA/NASA, Johnson was one of a few women, much less African American women, who were active in direct support of the American space program. Using her knowledge of analytic geometry, she calculated the trajectories for the May 5, 1961 space flight of Alan Shepard, the first American in space; John Glenn’s orbit around the Earth on February 20, 1962; the 1969 Apollo 11 mission (the first moon landing), and the 1970 Apollo 13 moon mission. Later in her career, Katherine worked on the space shuttle program, the Earth Resources Satellite, and on the plans for a mission to Mars as well as authoring or coauthoring 26 research reports.

Details

Date:
October 28
Time:
5:30 pm - 9:00 pm
Event Categories:
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Venue

Fredericksburg Expo Center
2371 Carl D. Silver Parkway
Fredericksburg, VA 22401 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
540-548-5555
Website:
http://www.fredericksburgexpocenter.com/